Two Mountains District
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The Camp Headquarters Cabin and Dan Beards Outdoor School
Lackawaxen Township, Pike County, PA

Wildlands and Dan BeardPreserving this cabin, this piece of history has significant meaning not only to the early beginnings of the Boy Scouts of American, but to Daniel Carter Beard and his association with the Northeastern Pennsylvania region. His original summer home, Wildlands, burned down in 1961. The other buildings of the Dan Beard Outdoor School for Boys no longer exist or have been moved. That makes this Kiva style log cabin the last remaining part of Beard's Outdoor School. Relocating and keeping the cabin in the NEPA region is important to preserving not only this history but it is also a tribute to a beloved founder of the BSA, Dan Beard himself.

In 1887, Daniel Carter Beard and his brother James first purchased property on Lake Teedyuskung in Lackawaxen Twp, Pike County, PA. The property was eventually deeded in full to Dan Beard. He built a log cabin in 1887 known as Wildlands as a summer home. In 1916 The Dan Beard Outdoor School for Boys was incorporated and the summer camp program began to take shape.

Dan Beard met Abner McPheters at an outdoor conference and designs for an additional log cabin on his property in Lackawaxen Twp, were formulated. Abner McPheters was a outdoor guide, lumber operations manager, and cabin builder from Maine. A deal was struck and McPheters came from Maine with five loggers (two are known at this time as Little Joe and Elmer) to construct the Kiva style cabin in 1926. The cabin was built on the East side of Welcome Lake Road which is now owned by Woodloch Pines. The purpose of building a Kiva style cabin is that it is well suited to be used as a large assembly room. This Camp Headquarters cabin was designed for that purpose. It is a 28' x 30' rectangular log building with walls reaching to the steeply pitched roof. Joists were placed during the construction (see photo) on the top of wall girders in a N-S orientation to accommodate a hanging room known as the Orioles Nest, which was placed at right angles in a East West direction.

This nest was constructed to float on the rafters so as not to take away from the rooms spacious appearance. The floor of the second level is locked into place by a king post that runs from the roof’s ridgepole to the second floor joist and held in place by wooden pegs. It was effective in reducing vibration and springing of the floor. Stairs were built on the NW side of the room leading to the Orioles Nest. The loft is surrounded with a “U” shaped balcony referred to as a “Romeo and Juliet” balcony.

An extension with a lean-to style roof is located on the east side of the cabin and contains 4 small rooms to be used as bedrooms and offices. The desire was to maintain focus on the cabins’ use as an assembly room. A porch extends from the NW side and continues to the South side of the cabin. A stone fireplace with a puncheon mantel was constructed on the east side of the assembly room. To build it, they first constructed a open face wooden box to be used as a form for laying the stones. Once the stones were laid and chimney finished, a fire was set burning the wooden form from the fireplace.

The front door of the cabin was referred to as a “Fort Pitt” door. It was constructed by using small tree trunks with one side flattened (puncheons.) Each puncheon was attached together to make 2 panels. A frame was constructed and the panels attached to each side. These panel seams were offset and covered on the insides sealing the seams to reduce air seepage. The outside panel overlapped the frame to complete the seal when the door was closed. One of the Maine Loggers, Little Joe, forged the metal hinges in Hawley at a blacksmith shop and hand carved the latches and handles for the door.

 

What Is Boy Scouts?

Lord Robert Baden-Powell began Scouting in Great Britain in 1907 and was immediately successful in attracting boys and adult leaders to its adventurous and fun outdoor program. In addition to teaching boys outdoor skills and teamwork, boys learned responsibility, character, and the need to do good for others. Several years later, in 1910, the Boy Scouts of America was incorporated to provide a program for community organizations that offers effective character, citizenship and personnel fitness training for youth. Over 100 years later, Scouting is one of the largest youth organizations in the world.

Membership

The Boy Scout program is for boys ages 11-17. Members join a Boy Scout Troop and are assigned to a patrol, usually a neighborhood group of six to eight boys, similar to a Cub Scout Den. Troops and their patrols meet weekly, practicing skills, playing games, and learning to plan and manage for themselves as the boys help organize outings, such as hikes, campouts, and outdoor trips, and other activities.

The role of the Scoutmaster and his staff of adult leaders is to coach the boys in developing leadership skills, thinking through problems and tasks, and learning how to work and play together as a team. The Troop Committee includes parents of boys in the Troop and members of the chartered organization.

The Purposes of Boy Scouting

Specifically, the BSA endeavors to help boys develop into American citizens who:

  • Are physically, mentally and emotionally fit
  • Have high degree of self-reliance as evidenced in such qualities as initiative, courage and resourcefulness
  • Have personal values based on religious concepts
  • Have the desire and skills to help others
  • Understand the principle of the American social, economic and governmental systems
  • Are knowledgeable about and take pride in their American heritage and understand our nation's role in the world
  • Have a keen respect for the basic rights of all people
  • Are prepared to participate in and give leadership to American society.

Personal Growth

As Boy Scouts plan their activities and progress toward their goals, they experience personal growth. The Good Turn concept is a major part of the personal growth method of Boy Scouting. Boys grow as they participate in community service projects and do Good Turns for others. Probably no device is as successful in developing a basis for personal growth as the daily Good Turn. The religious emblems program also is a large part of the personal growth method. Frequent personal conferences with his Scoutmaster help each Boy Scout to determine his growth toward Scouting's aims.

The Boy Scout Oath

On my honor, I will do my best
To do my duty to God and my country,
And to obey the Scout Law,
To help other people at all times
To keep myself physically strong,
Mentally awake, and morally straight

The Boy Scout Motto

Be Prepared

The Scout Law

A Scout is:
Trustworthy
Loyal
Helpful
Friendly
Courteous
Kind
Obedient
Cheerful
Thrifty
Brave
Clean
and Reverent

Scouting Memories

Long after a young man matures and grows into adulthood, the imprint of Scouting and what he learned and experienced in the program will stay with him. There are tons of stories about how Eagle Scouts frequently can be found in positions of leadership in their communities, churches, companies, and even in military service. But the fact of the matter is that even if a boy only gets as far as Tenderfoot, years later he will more than likely remember the Scout oath and the words "On my honor...", remember the name of the summer camp he went to, and the names of his patrol mates - even when he can't remember the date of his own wedding anniversary. Scouting soaks into the very core of the people who get involved in it because it gives meaning to Honor, Friendship, Trust, Faith, and all the other things that form us and sustain us as individuals. So even when a man stands hunched over his cane and his knurled fingers have to be willed to form the Scout sign, it's no surprise that many will say with a choked voice of pride packed with memories, "I remember...". And we're all better for it.

CLICK HERE to find a Scout Troop near you!

This will become the Weekend Camping page.

Delete this article when these pages are complete.

Journey to Excellence

A Boy Scout is taught to always “Do Your Best” and the Boy Scout Program encourages personal growth. As a Council, we believe that we should set the example by constantly striving to improve the council.

The BSA National Council has provided a measuring tool that provides guidance for our improvement called Journey To Excellence (“JTE”). All 295 Councils in the Boy Scouts of America are evaluated monthly in 18 criteria and may be classified as gold, silver, bronze or below standard in each of the 18 criteria as well as an overall council score.

We will provide a periodic update here as to our progress towards becoming one of the best small councils in the Boy Scouts of America. Please choose the Journey to Excellence page to see a detailed discussion of where we are in each category.

 

Current Status
(March 31, 2013)

1325 Points

Last Year

Year End 1425 Points

JTE Silver JTE Silver

 

On-Line Rechartering

It's Rechartering Time. You can save a lot of time and help ensure your charter is accurate by submitting your charter ONLINE. Once complete, you'll print our your signature page which you will submit to the Scout Service Center with the appropriate signatures.

Internet Rechartering allows you to renew your unit's charter online and perform the following actions:

  • Select members from your existing charter roster
  • Promote members from another unit
  • Add new members
  • Update member information
  • Print a summary of costs associated with the new charter.

Before beginning Internet Rechartering, collect all member information, including new member forms with the appropriate signatures. To complete the process, you must be connected to a printer to print the final report for signature.

To enter the Internet Rechartering site, CLICK HERE! You must use Internet Explorer to use the online system.

Important Documents and Resources

Internet advancement is the process that Scouting units use to record and track advancement ranks and awards for their youth. This process can be done from any Internet-connected computer at any time.

The next three years promise to be exciting for Scouting as all three of our traditional programs will be updated based on several years of volunteer-led research and development!

Venturing is first up in 2014 with a totally new program and recognition approach focusing on progressive development in adventure, leadership, and service to others and personal growth.

Then in 2015, Cub Scouting will be updated with a new Adventure-based advancement system, activities that are more active and more aligned with the Aims/Mission, Tiger Cub becomes simply - Tiger, with a  new image, and the earning of the Webelos badge no longer being required for the Arrow of Light.

And then in 2016, additions and revisions will be rolled-out to the Boy Scout requirements, including making Scout a rank.

To keep everyone up to date with all of the upcoming changes, the BSA has created a special Program Updates page in scouting.org.

CLICK HERE for more Information.

Taking Place at

King’s College
Wilkes-Barre, PA

Saturday, January 10, 2015
8:00 am - 6:00 pm

King's College

ONLINE REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN!

Early Registration Deadline: December 17, 2014
Registration Fee: $30.00 prior to December 17th
$40.00 after December 17th
(Lab fees are extra.)
Important: No registrations will be accepted after January 2nd.
Scouts can register for more than one Merit Badge, (not to exceed 8 hours of total class time).

 

Registration fee includes lunch and light breakfast. Merit Badge Courses are for First Class Scouts and above OR Scouts who have finished the 7th grade. Every Scout attending Merit Badge College must be currently registered with the Boy Scouts of America.

Venturing in Northeastern Pennsylvania

What Is Venturing?

Venturing is based on a unique and dynamic relationship between youth, adult leaders, and organizations in their communities. Local community organizations establish a Venturing crew by matching their people and program resources to the interests of young people in the community. The result is a program of exciting and meaningful activities that helps youth pursue their special interests, to grow, to develop leadership skills, and to become good citizens.

Venturing crews can specialize in a variety of avocation or hobby interests. Venturing programs are developed around six experience areas of emphasis: Citizenship; Leadership; Fitness; Social; Outdoor; Service.

Membership

Venturing is a youth development program of the Boy Scouts of America for young men and women who are 14 (and have completed the eighth grade) through 20 years of age.

Venturing's purpose is to provide positive experiences to help young people mature and to prepare them to become responsible and caring adults.

The Purposes of Venturing

Young adults involved in Venturing will:

  • Learn to make ethical choices over their lifetimes by instilling the values in the Venturing Oath and Code
  • Experience a program that is fun and full of challenge and adventure
  • Become a skilled training and program resource for Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, and other groups
  • Acquire skills in the areas of high adventure, sports, arts and hobbies, youth ministries, or Sea Scouting
  • Experience positive leadership from adult and youth leaders and be given opportunities to take on leadership roles
  • Have a chance to learn and grow in a supportive, caring, and fun environment.

Personal Growth

The methods of Venturing have been carefully chosen to meet the needs of young adults and help them grow into adulthood with confidence and fully developed interpersonal skills that can help them throughout their lifetime. These methods are:

  • Voluntary association between youth and adults. Because Venturing is voluntary, youth are receptive to new ideas, experiences, and relationships. For the youth members, these relationships provide a connection to new ways of thinking and acting, and a new identity as a responsible young adult.
  • Ethical decision-making. By asking young people to be responsible for themselves, for a program of positive activities and experiences, and for other people, Venturing provides numerous opportunities for making decisions and ethical choices. With the influence of positive adult role models and structured activities, youth learn to make effective and ethical decisions.
  • Group activities. Venturing activities are interdependent group experiences in which success is dependent on the cooperation of all youth and adults.
  • Recognition of achievement. Recognition might come through the achievement of one of the many awards available to youth members, but peers and adults also achieve it through the acknowledgement of a young person's competence and abilities.
  • Democratic process. Venturing crews provide exposure to democratic ideas and skills that are needed throughout life.
  • Curiosity, exploration, and adventure. New experiences and Venturing activities provide an excellent opportunity for acquiring new skills and participating in action-oriented activities.

The Venturing Oath

As a Venturer,
I promise to do my duty to God
and help strengthen America,
to help others, and to seek truth, fairness,
and adventure in our world.

The Venturing Code

As a Venturer, I believe that America's strength lies in our trust in God and in the courage, strength, and traditions of our people. I will, therefore, be faithful in my religious duties and will maintain a personal sense of honor in my own life. I will treasure my American heritage and will do all I can to preserve and enrich it. I will recognize the dignity and worth of all humanity and will use fair play and goodwill in my daily life.; I will acquire the Venturing attitude that seeks truth in all things and adventure on the frontiers of our changing world.

The Outdoor Code

As an American, I will do my best to -

  • Be clean in my outdoor manners.
    I will treat the outdoors as a heritage.
    I will take care of it for myself and others
    I will keep my trash and garbage out of lakes, streams, fields, woods, and roadways.
  • Be careful with fire.
    I will prevent wildfire.
    I will build my fires only where they are appropriate.
    When I have finished using a fire, I will make sure it is cold out.
    I will leave a clean fire ring, or remove all evidence of my fire.
  • Be considerate in the outdoors.
    I will treat public and private property with respect.
    I will use low-impact methods of hiking and camping.

and

  • Be conservation minded
    I will learn how to practice good conservation of soil, waters, forests, minerals, grasslands, wildlife, and energy.
    I will urge others to do the same.

CLICK HERE to find a Venturing Crew near you!

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